25 Tips for First-Time Home Buyers

June 6, 2017

Buying a home can be nervewracking, especially if you’re a first-time home buyer. Not only is it probably the biggest purchase of your life, but the process is complicated and fraught with unfamiliar lingo and surprise expenses.

To make the first-time home buying journey a little less stressful, NerdWallet has compiled these 25 tips to help you navigate the process more smoothly and save money. We’ve divided our list into three sections.

Click the section below that best describes the stage you’re in.

Read More: https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/mortgages/25-tips-for-first-time-home-buyers/

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What’s The Difference Between Asphalt Overlay and Asphalt Sealcoat?

Great Article:

From discussions we’ve had with our customers, it seems that many of them don’t understand the difference between an asphalt overlay and asphalt sealcoating. That’s understandable – they’re similar processes, both used for the repair and maintenance of your asphalt.

So, for our blog today, let’s take a quick look at the difference between overlays and sealcoats! Asking for one when you only need the other could lead to needless costs.

An Asphalt Overlay

An asphalt overlay is, essentially, a patch job done on a stretch of asphalt. This is the usual method when asphalt is showing some cracking or potholing, while still not being damaged enough to need replacement.

Asphalt SealcoatingIn this case, we come through with a paver and lay a thin layer of hot asphalt onto your existing surface, giving you an entirely new asphalt surface.  However, overlaying your old asphalt will not fix any issues underneath, and any cracks you have now will reflect through the new surface within a year or two, very similar to putting another layer of shingles on an existing roof, it can be done but it is generally not recommended in most circumstances.

An Asphalt Sealcoating

While sealcoat alone can sometimes fill extremely shallow cracks, crackfilling should be done on the larger cracks to prevent any water from penetrating under your asphalt. The sealcoating process is more like putting a coat of paint on your house. The end result is the same: A slightly shiny surface that discourages wear, prevents water or other spills from reaching the interior, as well as protecting against damaging sunlight.

Unlike the paint on your house, sealcoating wears out relatively quickly.   However, an inexpensive and easy sealcoat and crackfill every 2-4 years can usually prevent any other asphalt maintenance for decades to come. It’s by far the most cost-effective way of maintaining asphalt over long periods of time.

 

https://www.wolfpaving.com/blog/bid/95937/What-s-The-Difference-Between-Asphalt-Overlay-and-Asphalt-Sealcoat

How to Lay Recycled Asphalt

With people trying to be more environmentally responsible in the way we use and recycle building materials, it’s not a surprise to find that we can even recycle asphalt for paving streets and driveways. Although the end result of laying a recycled asphalt driveway may differ slightly from a virgin asphalt material, laying recycled asphalt can be fairly simple and can also save money over new asphalt.

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Recycled asphalt is reclaimed from demolished building projects and road construction.

Step 1

Remove tree branches, rocks, stumps and organic matter such as leaves from the area to be paved. Fill in any holes or deep cracks in the surface with sand or gravel, using a shovel. Break up any large clumps of earth with the tip of the shovel and smooth out the surface with the rake.

Step 2

Shovel the asphalt out across the length of the area being paved so there is an asphalt layer of at least 1 inch. Start at the top of the drive if you are paving the length of a driveway. Use a heavy-duty metal rake to even out the asphalt and create even coverage

Step 3

Tamp down the surface of the asphalt with a hand tamper. Move across the entire area and use the tamper to hit every square inch with solid force to compact the layer of asphalt. If you wish, leave the installation as it is at this step and drive over the surface slowly with a car or truck to further compact the asphalt layer. The recycled asphalt will be laid down just like a traditional gravel driveway and should stand up well for a few years

Step 4

Roll over the asphalt layer with a steam roller. The steam roller will further compress and heat the recycled asphalt so it essentially melts together and then sets up to form a hardened surface as durable as new asphalt. Allow the asphalt to cure for at least 24 hours.

Step 5

Apply a commercial-grade asphalt seal-coat product, using a brush. A sealer will also help protect the new layer of asphalt and help it last for many years.

 

 

 

 

 

across the area.

Asphalt Cement

Asphalt is a heavy, dark brown to black mineral substance, one of several mixtures of hydrocarbons called bitumens. Asphalt is a strong, versatile weather and chemical-resistant binding material which adapts itself to a variety of uses. Asphalt binds crushed stone and gravel (commonly known as aggregate) into firm, tough surfaces for roads, streets, and airport run-ways. Asphalt, also known as mineral pitch, is obtained from either natural deposits such as native asphalt or brea or as a byproduct of the petroleum industry (petroleum asphalt). Prehistoric animal skeletons have been preserved completely intact in natural asphalt deposits, one of the most famous being the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, Califomia.

Asphalt is one of the world’s oldest engineering materials, having been used since the beginning of civilization. Around 6000 B.C. the Sumerians had a thriving shipbuilding industry that produced and used asphalt for caulking and waterproofing. As early as 2600 B.C. the Egyptians were using asphalt as a waterproofing material and also to impregnate the wrappings of mummies as a preservative. Ancient civilizations widely used asphalt as a mortar for building and paving blocks used in temples, irrigation systems, reservoirs, and highways. The asphalts used by early civilizations occurred naturally and were found in geologic strata as either soft, workable mortars or as hard, brittle black veins of rock formations (also known as asphaltic coal). Natural asphalts formed when crude petroleum oils worked their way up through cracks and fissures to the earth’s surface. The action of the sun and wind drove off the lighter oils and gases, leaving a black residue. Natural asphalts were extensively used until the early 1900s. The discovery of refining asphalt from crude petroleum and the increasing popularity of the automobile served to greatly expand the asphalt industry. Modern petroleum asphalt has the same durable qualities as naturally occurring asphalt, with the added advantage of being refined to a uniform condition free from organic and mineral impurities.

Most of the petroleum asphalt produced today is used for highway surfacing. Asphalt paving material is a dull black mixture of asphalt cement, sand, and crushed rock. After being heated, it is dumped out steaming hot onto the roadbed, raked level, and then compacted by a heavy steamroller. Asphalt is also used for expansion joints and patches on concrete roads. Airport runways, tennis courts, playgrounds, and floors in buildings all use asphalt as well. Light forms of petroleum asphalt called road oils are sprayed on roadways to settle dust and bind gravel. Another major use of asphalt is in asphalt shingles and roll roofing, which usually consists of felt saturated with asphalt. The asphalt helps to preserve and waterproof the roofing material. Other applications for asphalt include the following: waterproofing tunnels, bridges, dams and reservoirs; rustproofing and sound-proofing metal pipes and automotive under-bodies; and soundproofing walls and ceilings.